Social Work

Contact

Librarian

Title

Chief Bibliographer, Social Sciences

Librarian Phone

(504) 865-5644

Book Chair

Dept. Chair

Dept Web Site

Program Description

Social Work has been taught at Tulane since 1914, with the school formally established in 1927, offering the M.A. degree. The first Master of Social Work degrees were offered in 1935, and the doctoral program was established in 1959. The School also currently offers a joint masters degree with the Tulane of School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, a joint degree with the Tulane Law School, a Certificate in Gerontology, as well as various continuing education and professional development courses. The stated mission of the School is to educate social work professionals to enhance the caring capacity of society by drawing upon its very strengths and resources. The Curriculum offered in the School is divided into the Foundation Curriculum, which focuses on generalist practice, the Advanced Curriculum, which focuses clinical practice, and Elective courses. Topics covered in the course offerings include: social work policy; social work practice; research and research methods; work with families, groups and communities; work in organizational environments; cross-cultural issues; human development; case analysis; crisis intervention; clinical practice with children, adolescents, adults and the elderly; conflict resolution and mediation; death and dying; domestic violence; human sexuality; chemical dependence; HIV disease; gerontological social work; disability; mental illness treatment and prevention. Faculty Research interests not included in the above list of course topics includes: social work education; health services provision; family caregiving of the disabled; services to minority populations; international social work education; information technology in social work education and practice; international migration and work with refugee populations; social support for the chronically and terminally ill; ethical issues involved in the relationship between families and public social service agencies; connections between social work research and resulting policies/practice; social work history; religion and American culture; parent-infant relationships; infant mental health; impact of violence on children; family and couples therapy; child abuse and incest; gay and lesbian issues; aging and homelessness; disaster social services; volunteerism; geographical analysis of social service systems; cross-cultural/international social work; elderly caregivers; women�s health and mental health; domestic violence; social justice and populations at risk; racism; relationships between African-American women and their daughters; parenting syles. In addition, the School operates the following Centers and Institutes: Center for Research and Training in HIV/AIDS Social Work; Porter-Cason Institute (focusing on therapeutic and preventive social work practice with families); Disaster and Volunteerism Research Center; Visualization Center (focusing on mediation training); Center for Lifelong Learning (focusing on professional development and continuing education for practicing social workers); Campus Affiliates Program Child and Family Development Project (a joint program with Xavier University). The School has 18 full-time faculty positions, and regularly draws from a pool of approximately 60-75 adjunct faculty members for coursework and practicum supervision. The student body in the School consists of approximately 200 MSW students and 20-25 doctoral students. The students come from diverse social, racial, and educational backgrounds, and many are non-traditional students, beginning second careers later in life. In addition, approximately 400-500 professionals a year participate in the School�s continuing education and lifelong learning courses and conferences.

Scope

Selection emphasis includes materials supporting course content in the areas of generalist practice; clinical practice; social work policy; social work practice; research and research methods; work with families, groups and communities; work in organizational environments; cross-cultural issues; human development; case analysis; crisis intervention; clinical practice with children, adolescents, adults and the elderly; conflict resolution and mediation; death and dying; domestic violence; human sexuality; chemical dependence; HIV disease; gerontological social work; disability; mental illness treatment and prevention; and community development. In addition, selection of materials is also guided by faculty research interests in areas including social work education; health services provision; family caregiving of the disabled; services to minority populations; international social work education; information technology in social work education and practice; international migration and work with refugee populations; social support for the chronically and terminally ill; ethical issues involved in the relationship between families and public social service agencies; connections between social work research and resulting policies/practice; social work history; religion and American culture; parent-infant relationships; infant mental health; impact of violence on children; family and couples therapy; child abuse and incest; gay and lesbian issues; aging and homelessness; disaster social services; volunteerism; geographical analysis of social service systems; cross-cultural/international social work; elderly caregivers; women�s health and mental health; domestic violence; social justice and populations at risk; racism; relationships between African-American women and their daughters; and parenting syles. Also, because of the interdisciplinary nature of the field, many of the materials collected to support social work research and teaching are utilized regularly by several other disciplines, including (but not limited to) Sociology; Psychology; Public Health; Women�s Studies.

Type

Materials sought for the collections include monographs; books in series; bibliographies and other reference works; periodicals. Textbooks are not collected, and Audio-Visual materials are bought selectively, usually on faculty request.

Format

The majority of materials added to the collections are print and electronic resources, with microforms also collected whenever appropriate, available, and affordable.

Language

English-language materials comprise the majority of those added to the collections, with important works in other major, Western-European languages also considered selectively.

Chronological Period

Appropriate subject-related materials treating the period of the late-20th century to the present are emphasized.

Imprint Date

The majority of materials added to the collections will be materials published in the last 3-5 years, with an emphasis on the most current titles. Older materials will be added selectively, and out-of-print materials are generally added only to replace items lost or missing from the collections.

Geographical Considerations

Materials treating subject areas of interest to the School with a focus on the Americas and Western Europe will form the bulk of the collections, but international, comparative studies are also sought.

Cooperative Resources

The Howard-Tilton Memorial Library is one of 14 members of a cooperative consortium of southern research libraries called KUDZU, which includes a shared online catalog. Loan requests through this system receive priority processing and expedited two-day delivery. The library is also a member of the cooperative Center for Research Libraries (CRL) in Chicago, through which we may borrow a wide range of rare materials for our users. Undergraduate students, graduate students, and faculty may borrow materials directly from the main library nearby at Loyola University of New Orleans through a reciprocal agreement called TU/LU. Graduate students and faculty may borrow materials at other New Orleans area academic libraries, and at other academic libraries throughout the state, through the LALINC consortium. For more information about cooperative borrowing privileges inquire at the library's Circulation Desk.

Supply Sources

Materials added to the collection are acquired through the Blackwell Book Services, Casalini, Puvill, Touzot and Harrassowitz approval plans, as well as directly from individual publishers and other book dealers. Gift materials are added to the collections when available and appropriate.

Endowed Funds

At present, no endowed funds are available to augment the Social Work collection development budget.

Selection Tools

Materials are routinely selected by examining book notification slips from all of the above-mentioned approval plans, publishers catalogs, fliers, and other announcements. Also, book and journal reviews from the following list of journals are regularly consulted: Choice; Contemporary Sociology; Social Forces; Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare; Sociology: the Journal of the British Sociological Association; the British Journal of Social Work; International Social Work; Social Service Review; Social Work.

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