Binding Wounds Pushing Boundaries Talk and Opening Reception

When:
Thursday, January 18, 2018 - 6:00pm to 8:00pm
Where:
Jones Hall - Second Floor - Room 204
6801 Freret Street
Description:
Join us for a talk Thursday, January 18 - 6:00 pm. Free and open to the public. Reception to follow at 7pm.

Mark Charles Roudané
Special Guest Speaker, http://www.roudanez.com
“Shifting Expectations and Activism:  An Appreciation of the Civil Rights Movement Born in New Orleans”
Jones Hall, Room 204
Jones Hall - 2nd floor.
 
MARK CHARLES ROUDANÉ’s great, great grandfather, Louis Charles Roudanez, was a physician, activist, and journalist. Roudanez founded the South’ first Black newspaper, L’Union (1862-1864), and America’s first Black daily, the New Orleans Tribune (1864-1869). Black New Orleanians rallied around the Tribune and organized one of the most important civil rights campaigns in American history. Issues of the Tribune are featured in the exhibition assembled from the Tulane Collections to accompany NLMs Binding Wounds: Pushing Boundaries travelling exhibition.
 
Mr. Roudané was born in New Orleans and currently resides in St. Paul, Minnesota. An educator, author, and public speaker, Mr. Roudané wrote The New Orleans Tribune, An Introduction to America’s First Black Daily Newspaper.  Mr. Roudané’s roots are in Africa, France, Haiti, and Louisiana.  His 4th great paternal and maternal grandmothers were enslaved in Saint-Domingue (now Haiti).  His ancestors lived as free people of color in Louisiana, including Jean Baptiste Roudanez, the publisher of the New Orleans Tribune, and Louis Charles Roudanez, the newspaper’s guiding force. Inspired by his heritage, Mark had devoted himself to the research of these historic journals.

“Shifting Expectations and Activism”
MARK CHARLES ROUDANÉ’s great‐great‐grandfather, Louis Charles Roudanez, was a physician, activist, and journalist.
Roudanez founded the South’s first Black newspaper, L’Union (1862‐1864), and
America’s first Black daily, the New Orleans Tribune (1864‐1869). Black New Orleanians
rallied around the Tribune and organized one of the most important civil rights
campaigns in American history. Issues of the Tribune are featured in the exhibition
assembled from the Tulane Collections to accompany NLM’s Binding Wounds: Pushing
Boundaries exhibition.
Mr. Roudané was born in New Orleans and currently resides in St. Paul, Minnesota. An
educator, author, and public speaker, Mr. Roudané wrote The New Orleans Tribune, An
Introduction to America’s First Black Daily Newspaper. Mr. Roudané’s roots are in Africa,
France, Haiti, and Louisiana. His 4th great paternal and maternal grandmothers were
enslaved in Saint‐Domingue (now Haiti). His ancestors lived as free people of color in
Louisiana, including Jean Baptiste Roudanez, the publisher of the New Orleans Tribune,
and Louis Charles Roudanez, the newspaper’s guiding force. Inspired by his heritage,
Mark has devoted himself to the research of these historic journals.
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Hours of the Exhibition: January 8 – February 16, 2018
Monday-Friday 10:00 am to 5:00 pm
Closed on University Holidays

A traveling exhibition from the National Library of Medicine (NLM)
hosted by Tulane University Libraries
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Thanks to all the exhibition contributors:
Tulane University Libraries: The Rudolph Matas Library of the Health Sciences, Louisiana Research Collection, University Archives and Howard-Tilton Rare Books and to the Louisiana community of Archivists and Librarians.
 
Special thanks to University Archives, Rare Books and the LaRC staff for all their assistance, and most especially for the exhibition installation help from Ann Case, Kathleen McCallister, Kevin Williams, Penny Lytle and Barbara Volo.